Shimano CN-HG50 6/7/8-Speed Chain

Shimano CN-HG50 6/7/8-Speed Chain

Shimano CN-HG50 6/7/8-Speed Chain

  • Shimano CN-HG50 Chain for 8-speed bikes
  • From Shimano’s Alivio/2200 mountain bike series
  • Average weight of 335 grams
  • Black pin link and roller link plates
  • Two-year warranty

Shimano HG-50 8-Speed Chains. Item Specifications: Color Black, Weight 338g, Width 7.4mm, Links 116links, Number of Speeds 8-Speed, Chain Compatibility 3/32″, Defined Color Black.

Price:

Customer Reviews


220 of 224 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars
Easy to replace, May 14, 2010
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

There really isn’t any one place to get all the information you need for this job, so here it is. Replacing a chain is easy and it’s like riding a new bike. Very smooth pedaling. Highly recommended. It’s a 15 minute job.

First, count the number of sprockets on the back wheel. Sprockets are the gears. For me it was 7.

That’s the number you need to order. This is a 6/7/8 chain, so it will work if you have 6, 7 or 8 sprockets.

Next, decide which chain. The quality goes up with the numbers. 50, 60, 70, 91. This one, 50, is at the bottom.

You’ll need a chain tool for about . I got the IceToolz Chain Tool 7-10 Speed Shimano HG/IG/UG chain tool, but note that the 7-9 size costs about half as much, and the extra money is probably wasted unless you need it. Your chain tool should also have a number that matches any number on the chain (not the number of sprockets). My tool says 7-10, so with 7 as one of the sizes of the chain I’m good to go. Note that even if you have 6 sprockets, because this chain *could* fit 7, the 7-9 or 7-10 tool will work for a 6/7/8 chain. It would not work for a 5/6 chain because 5 and 6 are not within the 7-9 or 7-10 range of the tools.

A chain tool lets you break links and put links on. There is no such thing as a master link: you just use the links that are on the chain to connect to one another. One reviewer said he used a missing link – you DON’T need a missing link or other kind of master link. The only thing a missing link will do is it will let you put the chain on without a tool, but putting the chain on with the tool is easy if you use the trick I describe below, so I’d skip the link and just buy the tool. If your chain is broke, you can use the missing link if you really want to otherwise, you’ll need the tool to pull the chain off, so you can use it to connect the chain without a missing link. Connecting the chain is trivial.

You might also want disposable gloves – probably two pair. The new chain is greasy. You’ll probably want a newspaper to put the old greasy chain on, a cable tie or twisty tie to tie back the deraileur and a zip lock bag to put the extra links from the new chain in for storage. You may want to consider cleaning your rear gears when the chain comes off. I carefully use carburator cleaner, avoiding getting any into the hub by just spraying the bottom.

Take the chain out of the box – it’s in a plastic bag. Find the extra pins that come with it. Save those for emergencies, you don’t need them now.

Shift to the smallest diameter sprocket, front and back. Note where the chain goes: it’s usually over the top derailer sprocket and then under the bottom one.

Now, here’s the difference between a 15 minute easy job and a half hour of problems: pull the rear derailer all the way forward and use a wire or cable tie to tie it to the bike frame.

The chain links are connected by pins. Pick any one on the old chain and use the tool to push it through. Pull the chain off. If you want to clean the rear gears, now is the easiest time to do it.

Hold the old chain up to the new one with the top ends matched and find the link on the new one that matches the last link on the old one. Be careful: a very old chain will have stretched a bit, and so you may have to match the links halfway down the chain so that you get the same *number of links*, not the same *length* chain of a stretched chain.

An aside: If your chain was "stretched", it’s likely to have worn down the gears, at least on the back. A stretched chain doesn’t actually stretch, what happens is the holes on the links that surround the pins get bigger from wear, causing the chain to become longer. The longer chain means if you ride aggressively, by pedaling hard, instead of the chain resisting the force, the sprockets (gears) have to resist it, and that wears down the sprockets. The one or two you use most will probably have significant wear, so this is a good time to inspect them. If you notice that the sprockets are particularly worn, you can replace the sprockets. It’s also a job you can do yourself, but it requires two more tools (a sprocket remove / chain whip tool and a cassette lock ring tool) for about , and is not super simple like replacing a chain. For me, it’s about a wash: the bike shop will charge you the anyways, and save you some work. It’s about a half hour of sort of difficult work doing it. If your sprockets are worn, this is the right time to replace them because you’d have to take the chain off to do it, so you may as well do it or have it done while you have the chain off. You’ll need to order a set of sprockets for your bike and also the tools, and then replace it or…

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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars
chain ok…instructions not so great, February 28, 2011
By 
Bif Bechenschnifter (College Park, MD United States) – See all my reviews

Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
This is a well built chain from a reputable company. It’s not one of Shimano’s best chains, but will serve the purpose and is reasonably priced. I’m giving it three stars, though, because I found Shimano’s included instructions more confusing than helpful. A previous reviewer supplied relatively detailed and generally helpful instructions, but he also included some relatively significant misinformation. He was correct in his description of a “master link” (and the absence of such master links in most chains), but incorrect in his understanding of how cut links are joined. Older chains allowed users to choose any rivet to remove and replace. Newer chains have rivets that are peened (mushroomed at the outer plate). Extruding those pins destroys the peened surface and weakens the chain (if the same pin is pressed back into the link). Shimano provides special joining pins that must be used to connect links (and those pins are then permanent…if you need to remove the chain, you need another joining pin). The problem with the Shimano instructions is that there are at least 4 different styles of joining pins available, and each pin requires a slightly different installation (some are left slightly extruded, some must be flush, some are longer, etc.). The instructions include information about all of the pins, but it’s difficult to match up the product number on the package with the instruction sheet. Even the Shimano website is confusing (three different information sheets for this particular chain, depending on a model number that is not evident on the packaging). I chose to keep my pin edges flush with the outer plates. Updates to follow, if the chain fails.

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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars
Quality chain, link pins not reusable, December 1, 2011
Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
It’s a perfectly good chain, but you can’t reuse the link pins. They’re machined too precisely to be reinserted so you have to use the special snap-off pin included in the package. Make sure you get the length right the first time or else you’ll need to get another snap-off style pin.

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3 comments

  • Charles G. "An Engineer and Business Person"
    220 of 224 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Easy to replace, May 14, 2010
    By 
    Charles G. “An Engineer and Business Person” (San Francisco, CA USA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)

    There really isn’t any one place to get all the information you need for this job, so here it is. Replacing a chain is easy and it’s like riding a new bike. Very smooth pedaling. Highly recommended. It’s a 15 minute job.

    First, count the number of sprockets on the back wheel. Sprockets are the gears. For me it was 7.

    That’s the number you need to order. This is a 6/7/8 chain, so it will work if you have 6, 7 or 8 sprockets.

    Next, decide which chain. The quality goes up with the numbers. 50, 60, 70, 91. This one, 50, is at the bottom.

    You’ll need a chain tool for about $12. I got the IceToolz Chain Tool 7-10 Speed Shimano HG/IG/UG chain tool, but note that the 7-9 size costs about half as much, and the extra money is probably wasted unless you need it. Your chain tool should also have a number that matches any number on the chain (not the number of sprockets). My tool says 7-10, so with 7 as one of the sizes of the chain I’m good to go. Note that even if you have 6 sprockets, because this chain *could* fit 7, the 7-9 or 7-10 tool will work for a 6/7/8 chain. It would not work for a 5/6 chain because 5 and 6 are not within the 7-9 or 7-10 range of the tools.

    A chain tool lets you break links and put links on. There is no such thing as a master link: you just use the links that are on the chain to connect to one another. One reviewer said he used a missing link – you DON’T need a missing link or other kind of master link. The only thing a missing link will do is it will let you put the chain on without a tool, but putting the chain on with the tool is easy if you use the trick I describe below, so I’d skip the link and just buy the tool. If your chain is broke, you can use the missing link if you really want to otherwise, you’ll need the tool to pull the chain off, so you can use it to connect the chain without a missing link. Connecting the chain is trivial.

    You might also want disposable gloves – probably two pair. The new chain is greasy. You’ll probably want a newspaper to put the old greasy chain on, a cable tie or twisty tie to tie back the deraileur and a zip lock bag to put the extra links from the new chain in for storage. You may want to consider cleaning your rear gears when the chain comes off. I carefully use carburator cleaner, avoiding getting any into the hub by just spraying the bottom.

    Take the chain out of the box – it’s in a plastic bag. Find the extra pins that come with it. Save those for emergencies, you don’t need them now.

    Shift to the smallest diameter sprocket, front and back. Note where the chain goes: it’s usually over the top derailer sprocket and then under the bottom one.

    Now, here’s the difference between a 15 minute easy job and a half hour of problems: pull the rear derailer all the way forward and use a wire or cable tie to tie it to the bike frame.

    The chain links are connected by pins. Pick any one on the old chain and use the tool to push it through. Pull the chain off. If you want to clean the rear gears, now is the easiest time to do it.

    Hold the old chain up to the new one with the top ends matched and find the link on the new one that matches the last link on the old one. Be careful: a very old chain will have stretched a bit, and so you may have to match the links halfway down the chain so that you get the same *number of links*, not the same *length* chain of a stretched chain.

    An aside: If your chain was “stretched”, it’s likely to have worn down the gears, at least on the back. A stretched chain doesn’t actually stretch, what happens is the holes on the links that surround the pins get bigger from wear, causing the chain to become longer. The longer chain means if you ride aggressively, by pedaling hard, instead of the chain resisting the force, the sprockets (gears) have to resist it, and that wears down the sprockets. The one or two you use most will probably have significant wear, so this is a good time to inspect them. If you notice that the sprockets are particularly worn, you can replace the sprockets. It’s also a job you can do yourself, but it requires two more tools (a sprocket remove / chain whip tool and a cassette lock ring tool) for about $30, and is not super simple like replacing a chain. For me, it’s about a wash: the bike shop will charge you the $30 anyways, and save you some work. It’s about a half hour of sort of difficult work doing it. If your sprockets are worn, this is the right time to replace them because you’d have to take the chain off to do it, so you may as well do it or have it done while you have the chain off. You’ll need to order a set of sprockets for your bike and also the tools, and then replace it or…

    Read more

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  • Bif Bechenschnifter
    25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    chain ok…instructions not so great, February 28, 2011
    By 
    Bif Bechenschnifter (College Park, MD United States) –

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This is a well built chain from a reputable company. It’s not one of Shimano’s best chains, but will serve the purpose and is reasonably priced. I’m giving it three stars, though, because I found Shimano’s included instructions more confusing than helpful. A previous reviewer supplied relatively detailed and generally helpful instructions, but he also included some relatively significant misinformation. He was correct in his description of a “master link” (and the absence of such master links in most chains), but incorrect in his understanding of how cut links are joined. Older chains allowed users to choose any rivet to remove and replace. Newer chains have rivets that are peened (mushroomed at the outer plate). Extruding those pins destroys the peened surface and weakens the chain (if the same pin is pressed back into the link). Shimano provides special joining pins that must be used to connect links (and those pins are then permanent…if you need to remove the chain, you need another joining pin). The problem with the Shimano instructions is that there are at least 4 different styles of joining pins available, and each pin requires a slightly different installation (some are left slightly extruded, some must be flush, some are longer, etc.). The instructions include information about all of the pins, but it’s difficult to match up the product number on the package with the instruction sheet. Even the Shimano website is confusing (three different information sheets for this particular chain, depending on a model number that is not evident on the packaging). I chose to keep my pin edges flush with the outer plates. Updates to follow, if the chain fails.

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  • Philip Mallory
    7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Quality chain, link pins not reusable, December 1, 2011
    By 

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    It’s a perfectly good chain, but you can’t reuse the link pins. They’re machined too precisely to be reinserted so you have to use the special snap-off pin included in the package. Make sure you get the length right the first time or else you’ll need to get another snap-off style pin.

    0

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